Definitions of Hypnosis are myriad; however this description from North Carolina Society of Clinical Hypnosis is one of the best I have read.

It’s not like what you see on the television or on stage

Hypnosis is a natural state of selective, focused attention, and, even though it is 100% natural and normal, it remains one of the most fascinating phenomena of the human mind. Our ability to enter this unique state of consciousness opens the door to countless possibilities for healing, self-exploration and change. Hypnosis, called by different names in different cultures and times, has been recognized for thousands of years and used for many purposes.

When we enter into the absorbed state of hypnosis, we can use our thoughts, talents and experiences in ways not usually available to us. With the help of a trained professional, we can develop innate, individual abilities that enable making desired changes in our thoughts, feelings and behaviors possible. For reasons that are as yet not clear, the focused state of hypnosis allows changes to intentionally be made “automatically”, changes that we could not ordinarily consciously make.

Hypnosis has been used in the treatment of pain, depression, anxiety, stress, habit disorders, and many other psychological and medical problems. However, it may not be useful for all psychological problems or for all patients or clients. The decision to use hypnosis as a component of treatment can only be made in consultation with a qualified healthcare provider who has been trained in the use and limitations of clinical hypnosis.

In addition to its use in clinical settings, hypnosis is used in research with the goal of learning more about the nature of hypnosis itself, as well as its impact on sensation, perception, learning, memory, and physiology. Researchers also study the value of hypnosis in the treatment of physical and psychological problems.

How can a treatment aimed at your mind affect your body?

The body responds physically to thoughts. For example, when we think a frightening thought, we can experience increased heart rate, shortness of breath, “butterflies” in the stomach, muscular rigidity, sweating, shaking, and so on. Similarly, when we think a pleasurable thought, we can experience reduced heart rate, deeper breathing, relaxation of muscles, and so on. These are autonomic nervous system responses that are involuntary, but they can be utilized to promote health. When hypnotized, an individual is very open to suggestions that can enhance positive and diminish negative physical reactions.

Can anyone be hypnotised?

Some people find it easier to relax than others. By the same token, some people are able to go into trance more quickly and more deeply than others. About 85% of people can go into at least a light trance. For most therapeutic goals, light trance is enough to enable almost everyone to benefit from hypnotherapy to some extent.

In a relatively small number of situations, (say, when hypnosis is being used instead of a general anesthetic, e.g., as in labor and childbirth), a deeper level of trance may be needed. For these purposes, it is helpful to determine the trance capability of a given person, before making a decision about the advisability of using hypnosis as an anesthetic.

Even for those people (maybe 10-15%) who do not enter into even a light trance state, hypnosis may still be helpful to assist their relaxation and improve their suggestibility to constructive comments and suggestions.

Will I be asleep or unconscious?

The word hypnosis comes from the ancient Greek word ‘hypnos’ meaning sleep, but it is miss-named. Hypnosis is NOT sleep. Sleep and hypnosis may seem similar since we may be relaxed and have our eyes closed (although not necessarily), but there are many differences. One main difference is that we tend to be in a relaxed state, but with heightened awareness! If a person were to fall asleep during a session, they would return to normal consciousness when asked to, or simply awaken after a short nap. They would feel refreshed, relaxed and would have no ill effects at all.

“I don’t think I was hypnotised–I heard every word you said!”

Some people, after a session of hypnosis, don’t believe that they were hypnotised at all. This likely comes from misconceptions about just what a ‘trance’ really is. There are differences between the brain waves of people who are asleep and those who are in trance. In practice, people who are hypnotised often talk with the hypnotist, and can both answer and ask questions, hear everything that is said very clearly, and are perfectly well aware.

There is no mysterious feeling to being hypnotised and our minds are not taken over nor controlled. This expectation and perhaps a demand to have some mysterious experience beyond conscious control or awareness seems to leave some people disappointed and even denying they had any experience at all. These same people may actually have received substantial results and unconscious change.

Will I lose control of myself?

No, there is no loss of control. Hypnosis allows clients to be more focused and less distracted and more skilful in using their own mental abilities constructively. In this way, they can achieve more of their goals, and consequently, actually achieve more (not less) control of their personal comfort, health, and well-being. The ‘control’ misconception appears to originate from stage hypnosis which actually involves people doing what they want to be doing in a social agreement to be entertaining.

Can I become stuck or trapped in the hypnotic state?

No. At any time a client can re-alert or choose to ignore suggestions. No one stays hypnotised indefinitely – you will always “come out” of trance within a short time.

Dr A.M Krasner in his book The Wizard Within describes Hypnosis as: a process which produces relaxation, distraction of the conscious mind, heightened suggestibility and increased awareness, allowing access to the unconscious mind through the imagination. It also produces the ability to experience thoughts and images as real.

For the process to be effective, there are two components that must be present: Belief and Expectation.

A simple formula for hypnosis then is:

BELIEF+ EXPECTATION=HYPNOSIS

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Just a big thanks to Mike Walton for sparing his time yesterday and helping me out with a bad back.I’ve suffered on and off for the last 20 years and recently experienced another episode which makes it pretty uncomfortable to move around.For the first time in 3 weeks I’ve been able to walk with out any discomfort.

Feels great indeed.A huge thank you,anyone suffering old injuries and pain I highly recommend Mike Walton at Horizon Therapies,cheers again Mike

Brett Kearney
Matlock